Posts tagged with genes

Facing The Genetics of Obesity

Posted on April 28, 2011 by 3 Comments

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weight and genesWhen it comes to weight, not all people are created equal, it seems.

You probably know some “naturally thin” people in your own life. The ones who never exercise, seem to eat anything they want, and yet not gain weight. Likewise, you probably know people (maybe yourself!) that seem to gain weight very easily, even if they exercise more and eat less than the “naturally thin” folks.

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Brown Fat: What is It?

Posted on April 18, 2011 by Leave a comment

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fat cellsSomething many of us in the weight loss community have been following lately is the research on brown fat, a.k.a. brown adipose tissue, or BAT.

Why are we so interested? Preliminary research suggests this special kind of fat, found mostly at the back of the neck and along the base of the spine, seems to be connected with helping control and regulate one’s metabolism and weight.

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Could You Have The “Addiction” Gene?

Posted on February 24, 2011 by 4 Comments

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addictionA new study linking a family history of alcoholism and obesity raises the question: Are addictions to alcohol and food connected?

The study by Washington University in St. Louis researchers looked at addiction and obesity trends from a national survey conducted in 1991 and 1992 and in 2001 and 2002, and found that women with a family history of alcoholism were 49 percent more likely to be obese than those without a family history of alcoholism. Men with a family history of alcoholism were also more likely to be obese, to a lesser degree.

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Why is Obesity Increasing So Much?

Posted on December 13, 2010 by 12 Comments

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scaleIt’s no secret that as a society, Americans and other industrialized nations are getting heavier and obesity rates are skyrocketing compared to generations past. But have you ever wondered why this is happening?

It’s something I think about all of the time, and here is what I believe: Like obesity itself, there are multiple causes that together add up to create the crisis.

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Could Your Genes Be Affecting Your Weight?

Posted on October 28, 2010 by 5 Comments

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family exerciseTwo recent studies linking obesity, appetite, and the tendency to gain weight to certain genes support something that I have suspected for some time – that the familiar “calories-in and calories-out” mantra only tells part of the obesity story. Another part that we’re only beginning to understand is the role genetics and other factors play in body weight.

Here’s the gist of the studies, which were published in Nature Genetics: One reviewed 46 previous studies on the topic of genes and weight and found 18 new genetic regions associated with BMI (body-mass index), as well as confirmed 14 genetic regions previously linked to metabolism, appetite, and other weight gain factors. The second study reviewed 32 previous studies and found links between 13 genes and a genetic tendency to gain weight around the abdomen, which greatly increases risk of  metabolic syndrome and conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. The bottom line of both studies: The more of these genes a person had, the more likely he or she was to struggle with weight.

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